WALK | MARCHE

Profane perambulations:
A walk considering the monument to victims of communism

DÉAMBULATIONS PROFANES : UNE PROMENADE CONSIDÉRANT LE MONUMENT AUX VICTIMES DU COMMUNISME

National War Memorial. Ottawa, John Vetterli, CC BY SA

National War Memorial. Ottawa, John Vetterli, CC BY SA

 

This version of a guided walk through the Parliamentary Precinct will stage short, 5 minute riffs or provocations by selected speakers on particular sites of memorialization. A soap box, a claxon, a timer, and a group in motion, bearing witness to capital counter-memories.  At the end we will gather for drinks, lunch, and more informal discussion. The aim: to produce an interactive map or an app, a start at a spatial history of Ottawa.

Cette version d’une visite guidée de la colline parlementaire mettra en scène de courtes présentations ou provocations de 5 minutes par une série d’orateurs sur une sélection de sites mémoriels. Une boîte de savon, un klaxon, une minuterie et un groupe en mouvement témoigneront de contre-mémoires capitales. À l’issue de la marche, nous nous réunirons pour une discussion plus informelle autour d’un déjeuner. L’objectif : produire une carte interactive ou une application numérique, un départ à une histoire spatiale d’Ottawa.

Saturday, September 26, 10am – 12:30pm, with lunch following

Meeting place: City Hall, Laurier entrance
Destination: Mill St Pub

Stopping points:
Nelson Mandela Square, National War Memorial, Famous Five Monument, 1812 Monument – « Triumph Through Diversity », Site for the Memorial to the Victims of Communism, Windmill’s « Zibi » development site, Holocaust Memorial, Canadian Firefighters Memorial.

Speakers:
Nadine Blumer, Douglas Cardinal, Stacy Douglas, Jennifer Henderson, David Hugill, Brian McDougall, Ian Mortimer, Monica Patterson, Samah Sabrah, Rebecca Schein.

Organized by Radcarleton.

READ MORE:
A Public Humanities Experiment in the Parliamentary Precinct by Dr. Monica Eileen Patterson
 

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Nadine Blumer

Nadine Blumer (Ph.D. Sociology, University of Toronto) is a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at Concordia University where she is affiliated with the Centre for Ethnographic Research and Exhibition in the Aftermath of Violence (CEREV). Her research explores the development of Canada’s newest cultural institution, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) and how the museum’s curatorial practice constitutes part of a larger network of commemorative spaces and activist responses across the country. An article on this subject was recently published in a special issue on the CMHR in the Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies. Nadine is also in the process of game-ifying her research program. Working in the context of the burgeoning field of serious-issues (video) games, she is experimenting with new methodologies for addressing commemoration of violent histories and victim group competition versus solidarity, with a particular focus on commemoration of the Nazi genocide of Europe’s Roma population.

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Douglas Cardinal

(Bio forthcoming)
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Stacy Douglas

Stacy Douglas is Assistant Professor of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. Former Co-Director of the Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality at Kent Law School, as well as Editorial Board member of Feminist Legal Studies and feminists@law, she has published academic and political commentary in Law and Critique; Law, Culture & the Humanities; Theory & Event; Radical Philosophy; Australian Feminist Law Journal; Canadian Dimension; and Truthout, and recently co-edited a special issue of the Canadian Journal of Law and Society on law and decolonization. She is winner of the 2014 Julien Mezey dissertation prize from the Association for Law, Culture, and the Humanities.

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Monica Eileen Patterson

Monica Eileen Patterson is an Assistant Professor in the Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She holds a doctorate in Anthropology and History and a certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Michigan. Patterson is coeditor of Curating Difficult Knowledge: Violent Pasts in Public Places (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and Anthrohistory: Unsettling Knowledge and Questioning Discipline (University of Michigan Press, 2011). As a curator, scholar, and activist, she is particularly interested in the intersections of memory, childhood, and violence in postcolonial Africa, and the ways in which they are represented and engaged in contemporary public spheres.

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Jennifer Henderson

Jennifer Henderson is an associate professor in the Department of English at Carleton University. Her research and teaching address linkages between settler colonialism, cultural production, and rationales of government in Canada. She is the author of Settler Feminism and Race Making in Canada (2003) and the co-editor of Reconciling Canada: Critical Perspectives on the Culture of Redress (2013).

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David Hugill

(Bio forthcoming)
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Brian McDougal

(Bio forthcoming)
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Ian Mortimer

(Bio forthcoming)
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Samah Sabrah

(Bio forthcoming)
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Rebecca Schein

Rebecca Schein earned her doctorate in the History of Consciousness Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research interests include: Marxist political economy and cultural studies; the commodification and decommodification of public goods and services; rights, commons, citizenship, and moral claims; mutual aid and social movement dynamics; social movement or community unionism; and political cultures of solidarity.

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